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Hong Kong New Global Trade Leader welcome reception

Posted By Lizzy HE, Monday, 23 October 2017

Hong Kong Hinrich Global Trade Leader welcome reception

22 Oct 2017

Lizzy

It was a super exciting day! At the invitation of Hinrich Foundation's Alumni Leadership Committee, I feel very honored to attend this party along with other new scholars. Of course, there were more than new scholars. Hinrich alumni, team members and representatives from universities and corporations were all there. Just imagine how awesome it is!

Some scholars and I went for this reception directly from Asia world Expo because we were in the exhibition. It was a long journey, but at the time we arrived the A Pullman Hotel, our tiredness was gone. We were attracted to the splendid view outside the window.

 

Before the party started, people already could not wait to get on the stage! (We were just rehearsing. :D)

There were also various kinds of exquisite pastries and delicacies to keep everyone energetic. It was finger-licking good! These refreshments not only kept us from hunger but also offered the chance to keep us gathered and just chat. Even though it might be the first time we meet each other, everyone was so friendly, and we had a lot of fun together.  

 

 

 

I felt so excited to meet Mr. Hinrich, he is even nicer than I thought. I really appreciated for his support to me and other young people with dreams and it was my wish to say thanks to him in person. I was so happy because we took a photo together.

Mr. Hinrich delivered an inspiring speech. I am very impressed for his achievements in international trade and he is still working so hard to promote global trade. I feel highly motivated to be a participant of international trade and make my own contribution.

Mr. Hinrich presented an award and an autographed book to each of the new scholar. It was very meaningful and inspiring.  

New scholars were still the stars that night. We were chatting about days in Hong Kong, sharing the previous working experience and discussing about future plan. It was so nice to talk with someone who share the same ambitions with you and work hard for realizing their dreams.

Now as a member of Hinrich Foundation, I also want to encourage more young people with enthusiasm in global trade to participate in it. To discover and seize the chance they find in life and never give up until achieving their dreams. We took a series of pictures implying the four key words “Learn, Fun, Creative & Team work” to tell the future scholars what it requires to be a Hinrich foundation scholar and one day a real global trade Leader. I hope more and more young talents can join us and through the growth path to make a little difference to the trade industry. Best wishes to the scholars, alumni, team members, Hinrich Foundation, our partners and everyone who is passionate about trade.

Tags:  Hong Kong  reception 

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My First Mid Autumn Festival in Hong Kong

Posted By Putro A. Harnowo, Saturday, 14 October 2017

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For me, the most baffling thing about Hong Kong is both its gentrification and preservation. Amidst the ubiquitous modern lifestyle, I can see many traditional rituals and landmarks almost everywhere, especially on Mid Autumn Festival where it is all about celebration, mooncake, lantern and dragon.

The Mid-Autumn Festival is held on the 15th day of the 8th month of the lunar calendar, corresponding to late September to early October. About three weeks after starting my study in Hong Kong Baptist University, I had a chance to see how glorious the celebration is. Among other things, Tai Hang Dragon Fire Dance is the most expected for Hong Kongers and tourists.

Starting on the 14th night, a “dragon” roamed around in Tai Hang area for three consecutive nights and was extended for one more night this year. The dragon has 67-metre long and 100 kg weight with over 70,000 sticks of burning incense and is carried by more than 300 men, former and current Tai Hang residents, of all ages. Women can also take part as drummer and narrator while children parade by holding the lantern. Basically, this is a collaborative three-hours performance of all member of the community.

Its origin can be traced in 1880 when Tai Hang, a village of farmer and fisherman then, struck by a plague. The superstitious ancient villagers made a dragon out of straw, put burning incense sticks, and paraded it to entire place as hoping to dispel the disease away. Surprisingly, it worked and turned into annual tradition afterwards. I can say, the story resembles its resident's character; conquering predicament for creating a blessing.

Photo: The gate of Tai Hang street embellished with lanterns and neon sign to ensure everyone noticed the venue. Visitor would not get any difficulty to find out since the entrance was shining brightly across the main street.

Photo: A woman took picture of Tai Hang street lanterns. The light would be on from dusk until dawn. The visitor started to flow in the vicinity at 7 pm while the show commenced at 8 pm.

Photo: Policemen blocked the road and secure the sidewalk with metal fence to maintain the flow in order. Wun Sha Street, where the Dragon Fire Dance took place, had been sterilized from any vehicle and visitor. Every turn was guarded by two to three personnel.

Photo: Several minutes before the show, the organizer coordinated with policeman as visitor started to gather near the main area to get the better view.

Photo: The show began with a set of percussion played on a cart wandering around the entire block of Wun Sha street. The sound was reverberating enough to attract the audiences for taking pictures and assembling in a large crowd.

Photo: While the dragon was being prepared and the percussion kept pounding, a group of litle girls in traditional red dress were waiting for their turn. Another group of men held lanterns with Tai Hang Dragon Fire written in Chinese and English letters on it.

Photo: Two women lit the candle inside lotus-shaped lanterns to be brought by the little girls.

Photo: Little girls in red traditional costume walked with lotus lantern in their hand to light the way of the dragon, followed with teenagers held star and round shaped lanterns.

Photo: A lotus lantern girls posed for pictures

Photo: The 67-metres dragon stretched out on the Wun Sha Street for grooming with thousands of burning incense sticks. Its smoke filled the cold night air.

Photo: The dragon swirled furiously along the way to cast out the bad lucks. Two men took turn holding up the head as kept it running. Weighted around 100 kg in total, this beast surely hard to control.

Photo: Close up of the dragon's head covered with smoke.

Photo: Among the orderly chaotic crowd, a man carried his son to watch the main attraction of Mid-Autumn Festival.

Photo: The fire dragon swirled and waved close to the audience, ran like a fiery beast hunting for the prey.

Photo: Flamed with burning incenses, the Dragon Fire chased two pearls across the street. Men took turn to hold the stake that support the head and the body while the drum beat kept playing in the background.

Photo: A man stood by near the dragon, waiting for his turn while watching his team mates dancing with the flamed incenses.

Photo: The bearer of dragon's tail tried his best to follow the unpredictable movement of his team mates.

 

Photo: Men inserted the burned incense sticks into dragon's body made of straws. They had to be careful to not harm their friends with fire.

Photo: After several trips of wandering around, the fire eventually went out. The dragon bearers distributed the incense sticks from the dragon's body to spectators. 

 

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Tags:  festival  hong kong  traditional 

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My First Mid Autumn Festival in Hong Kong

Posted By Putro A. Harnowo, Saturday, 14 October 2017

For me, the most baffling thing about Hong Kong is both its gentrification and preservation. Amidst the ubiquitous modern lifestyle, I can see many traditional rituals and landmarks almost everywhere, especially on Mid Autumn Festival where it is all about celebration, mooncake, lantern and dragon.

The Mid-Autumn Festival is held on the 15th day of the 8th month of the lunar calendar, corresponding to late September to early October. About three weeks after starting my study in Hong Kong Baptist University, I had a chance to see how glorious the celebration is. Among other things, Tai Hang Dragon Fire Dance is the most expected for Hong Kongers and tourists.

Starting on the 14th night, a “dragon” roamed around in Tai Hang area for three consecutive nights and was extended for one more night this year. The dragon has 67-metre long and 100 kg weight with over 70,000 sticks of burning incense and is carried by more than 300 men, former and current Tai Hang residents, of all ages. Women can also take part as drummer and narrator while children parade by holding the lantern. Basically, this is a collaborative three-hours performance of all member of the community.

Its origin can be traced in 1880 when Tai Hang, a village of farmer and fisherman then, struck by a plague. The superstitious ancient villagers made a dragon out of straw, put burning incense sticks, and paraded it to entire place as hoping to dispel the disease away. Surprisingly, it worked and turned into annual tradition afterwards. I can say, the story resembles its resident's character; conquering predicament for creating a blessing.

Photo: The gate of Tai Hang street embellished with lanterns and neon sign to ensure everyone noticed the venue. Visitor would not get any difficulty to find out since the entrance was shining brightly across the main street.

Photo: A woman took picture of Tai Hang street lanterns. The light would be on from dusk until dawn. The visitor started to flow in the vicinity at 7 pm while the show commenced at 8 pm.

Photo: Policemen blocked the road and secure the sidewalk with metal fence to maintain the flow in order. Wun Sha Street, where the Dragon Fire Dance took place, had been sterilized from any vehicle and visitor. Every turn was guarded by two to three personnel.

Photo: Several minutes before the show, the organizer coordinated with policeman as visitor started to gather near the main area to get the better view.

Photo: The show began with a set of percussion played on a cart wandering around the entire block of Wun Sha street. The sound was reverberating enough to attract the audiences for taking pictures and assembling in a large crowd.

Photo: While the dragon was being prepared and the percussion kept pounding, a group of litle girls in traditional red dress were waiting for their turn. Another group of men held lanterns with Tai Hang Dragon Fire written in Chinese and English letters on it.

Photo: Two women lit the candle inside lotus-shaped lanterns to be brought by the little girls.

Photo: Little girls in red traditional costume walked with lotus lantern in their hand to light the way of the dragon, followed with teenagers held star and round shaped lanterns.

Photo: A lotus lantern girls posed for pictures

Photo: The 67-metres dragon stretched out on the Wun Sha Street for grooming with thousands of burning incense sticks. Its smoke filled the cold night air.

Photo: The dragon swirled furiously along the way to cast out the bad lucks. Two men took turn holding up the head as kept it running. Weighted around 100 kg in total, this beast surely hard to control.

Photo: Close up of the dragon's head covered with smoke.

Photo: Among the orderly chaotic crowd, a man carried his son to watch the main attraction of Mid-Autumn Festival.

Photo: The fire dragon swirled and waved close to the audience, ran like a fiery beast hunting for the prey.

Photo: Flamed with burning incenses, the Dragon Fire chased two pearls across the street. Men took turn to hold the stake that support the head and the body while the drum beat kept playing in the background.

Photo: A man stood by near the dragon, waiting for his turn while watching his team mates dancing with the flamed incenses.

Photo: The bearer of dragon's tail tried his best to follow the unpredictable movement of his team mates.

 

Photo: Men inserted the burned incense sticks into dragon's body made of straws. They had to be careful to not harm their friends with fire.

Photo: After several trips of wandering around, the fire eventually went out. The dragon bearers distributed the incense sticks from the dragon's body to spectators. 

 

Tags:  festival  hong kong  traditional 

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2 anecdotes about Hong Kong

Posted By roxanne liu (liu), Saturday, 14 October 2017

Being a 2017 Hinrich Foundation Scholar, I was experienced ups and downs, excitement and confusion, culture shocks and happiness in my Hong Kong life. My perception of Hong Kong has changed a lot during my one-month stay and I absolutely love that I am able to understand Hong Kong and its people more and more. However, there are some misconceptions and I would like to dispel the myths.

1. Is the transportation really convenient?

Hong Kong has a highly developed and sophisticated transport network, encompassing both public and private transport including trains, buses, trams, ferries and minibuses.

Nevertheless, I felt totally uncomfortable about the minibuses. I studied in Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong. Minibuses are widely used when we get to subway station. In general, the Minibus seating capacity is 16 and destination are displayed on the front window. The English characters are sometimes very small and hard to spot/read when the Minibus is passing by. If a passenger would like to get off, he or she needs to indicate this one to the driver which can be for a non-Cantonese speaker quite difficult. There are no bells are buttons to be pushed (only a very small number of vehicles are equipped with this) and passenger usually need to shout to get off. Some rides can be quite rough due to the high speed and/ or the limited leg room.

2. Are there only skyscrapers and many people in Hong Kong?

Right and… wrong. Yes, the congestion and overcrowding are highly visible in Causeway Bay, Mong Kok and Tsim Sha Tsui.

However, Hong Kong also consists of more than 230 small and big islands and is home to beautiful beaches and jungly hiking paths.

Theses photos were taken by my friend in Cheung Chau island.

I just love the contrast, one minute you are in the middle of shopping malls, an exhaustive dining scene, high and modern buildings, crowded places and noisy streets and a 30 mins ferry ride later you hear birds and have your feet in water and look over an empty white beach.

 

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Tags:  hong kong 

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A tale of two cities

Posted By Lizzy HE, Friday, 13 October 2017
Updated: Friday, 13 October 2017

A tale of two cities

 

Hong Kong & my hometown - Hangzhou

By Lizzy

 

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My hometown is a city located in east edge of China. This is a place famous for the beautiful scene and romantic stories. Nowadays it is also know as the chinese E-commercial center because this is where Alibaba group and Taobao were founded. It is a place quite different from where I am living now – Hong Kong. 

 

Hangzhou
This is the city where I used to live. It is a place embraced by water and flowers. People there live in a slow-pace lifestyle usually.

First time in Hong Kong
I was shocked to see so many skyscrapers. I like the modern style of Hong Kong.   

 

Food in HZ vs Food in HK

Left side are the dishes of Hangzhou, we like light or sweet taste. Fish, shrimp are the common ingredients for dinner. Right side are the food from HK, HK food are delicate and very much health-oriented. Dim sum and desserts are the important part of local food.


Night in HZ & Night in HK

In the night, my hometown becomes very quiet. Some people will go to Westlake and just sit on the couch there tor relaxing. Hong Kong is a city that never sleeps. The whole city is still vigorous even in the night.



Weather in HZ & weather in HK

My hometown is very cold in winter, the temperature is nearly 0 Celsius. Sometimes it snows. However, Hong Kong is much warm relatively. Recently, it is autumn in Hangzhou but I still feel like summer here.

Lifestyle

Hangzhou is a slow city, people will choose cycle for go sightseeing whole day yet Hong Kong is a productive and efficient place where people are always moving quickly.

Even though it is the first time I actually started living in a different city by myself, I am enjoying it. There are many diffcult things to overcome indeed, but it is a chance for me to become more independent and professional. More importantly, I have already made many good friends here!

Besides the differences, these two cities have some similarity too. In Hangzhou everyone uses Alipay as a convenient payment method, just as here people have octopus card. The metro in Hangzhou is cooperatively building with HK MTR company, the whole operation system in Hangzhou is the same as in HK. Although sometimes I do feel homesick :D, I really appreciate this chance to be here and grateful for what I have now. Hong Kong is an amazing place. Here, I can do something or meet somebody that I never thought I have chance to do so.  This is just a start, I am looking forward to experience more in HK!

All the photos were taken by the Author. 

 

Tags:  cities  Hangzhou  Hong Kong 

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Hong Kong surprises me in a nice way

Posted By Yen Nguyen Thi Hong, Thursday, 12 October 2017

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1. Walk – walk – walk. Hong Kong people walk more steps per day than anyone else. And it is not easy for me to adapt with the walking culture here. On my very first day in Hong Kong, even a women in her 8th months prenant can walk faster than me. Good news is that I finally know how to walk like a Hongkonger. Every day is now a good day’s walk!

 

2. Hiking – when I realize how weak I am. It was a beautiful morning that I and my friend Putro decided to hike the Lion Rock. I searched about Lion Rock before climbing, and it said “Lion Rock is an easy hike with your friends”. Uhmm, sound great!!! Let’s go!

 

Everything couldn’t have started better for us with full of energy and great stories along the way. Then we soon realized that it was not easy even to get to the entrance with plenty of stairs and uphill climbs. We were out of breath and desperately chugging water just on the way to the main entrance. Local grandpa and grandma staired at us while they were…running to the top of Linon Rock. Yes, they did not hike, they run to the top. Meanwhile, I and my friend took a rest every…50 meters on the way and definitely smell like weak people with… our supposed-to-be-strong faces. The below picture can help you imagine why hiking Lion Rock is torturing…but rewarding at the same time. 

3. All-in-one Octopus card. You can use the all-in-one Octopus card for transportation, vending machines, supermarkets, parking machines,… Going anywhere and buying anything without cash. How James Bond is that

Me on the peak of Lion Rock

Tags:  hong kong  life  student  surprises 

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Charlee's life in Hong Kong

Posted By Imee Charlee Delavin, Thursday, 12 October 2017

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Moving to another country to study may be one of the most thrilling experiences anyone could ever have. Other than packing your bags to a "brighter future," you also move away from family, friends and everything that actually makes up for a comfort zone to the jungle of the unknown and who knows what. Quite scary right? But it’s also pretty exciting.

Being in Hong Kong (at least for us Masters in International Journalism students), meeting new people, living in a different society -- all by yourself, or with new friends, up to you -- and having that luxury of time (somehow) to actually think about life in general while you work your way up to better opportunities is not something that comes to everyone and Hinrich Foundation made it happen for all of us, I’m one lucky person, and so are you, thus, this memory “box” to keep an account of how it all started.

This blog is not all about my feelings though, this is about my experiences in the past month, this is for future scholars of the Foundation, who, at some point, will be residing at the NTT halls (shocked that there is actually Wi-fi in the rooms even if you're told there is "none" during check-in), be eating BBQ pork with rice at the undergraduate canteen, those who will be get to learn the trick of asking for more Spam instead of "sausage" in the signature dish and future scholars who will feel the same happiness as I did, when I found out that there is actually a "heaven" called Lok Fu near HKBU (Hi, Yen!) This is also for everyone who just wanted to be entertained by my random ramblings :P

The latter part of this entry will also introduce my fellow MAIJS scholars (who are literally with me all the time, save those moments when I purposely distance myself from them so they also have a chance to meet other new friends. Hahaha!) We’ve known each other over the weeks, attended most classes together and I would like to give you a glimpse of the memories we’re starting to create together and how I found this other family with them, away from home (Awwwww).

   MAIJS scholars 2017 infront of the NTT House, our first group photo together from L-R : Rahoof (India), Yen (Vietnam), Pheana (Cambodia), Charlee (Philippines), Putro (Indonesia)

Before coming to Hong Kong, aside from the things they tell you to pack and bring, NEVER, EVER forget to bring snacks (LOTS OF IT!!!), clothes hanger, detergent, utensils, a mug, water bottle, and thick blanket cause mind you, you won't know where to get these things in the first week. You wouldn't know yet where Lok Fu or Festival Walk is and you'll be so busy feeling overwhelmed that you are finally in Hong Kong that you won't get out of the HKBU compound, just yet.

The AAB Building, located beside NTT House is where you register for enrollment. There’s also canteen on the 5th floor.

Upon arriving at the Hong Kong Airport, ladies and gentlemen, there is a Bus E22 which takes you directly to HKBU which would save you from a lot of trouble. Don't be like one current scholar (not me), who took the MTR and cab to NTT! Experience may be the best teacher, but at least not on this one.

Dr. Ng Tor Tai International House is situated just beside HKBU’s AAB Buildling. It’s along Renfrew Road, #32. You need to cross the street where the bus stops and then, just walk straight ahead. Don’t expect people to actually help you out with your luggage so don’t bring your whole house, like I did. Haha!

The keycard of your room in NTT, you have to keep this with you for going out and coming back of the NTT and your room

When you’ve finally settled in, you might feel devastated (hello millenials!!!) by the fact that the receptionist would actually tell you there is no Wi-Fi in the NTT rooms but there is a LAN to connect to your laptop. Don’t panic; just do the same registration for both the LAN and Wi-fi for your mobile, but only one device at a time please! If you insist, the library’s 2nd and 3rd floors –which is walking distance from NTT –are open 24 hours a day and 7 days a week, there’s also Wi-fi there and some desktops that you can use.

(L-R) The view from the 11th floor window and my room in NTT. There’s a mini refrigerator for storing some food! There’s a place to heat your food on the 5th floor, and a vending machine on the 3rd. No cooking at all times please.

Dear scholars, for those who might need some reminding, sneakers is a MUST here since Hong Kong is a "walking society". You'll be walking a lot here, and I mean, A LOT, so better come with a comfortable wear and tear shoes and show your feet some love (literally). Walking from HKBU to the MTR stations is a feat at the start that you’ll need to conquer each time you wish to go somewhere outside HKBU. It will take some time before you realize there's a bus 25M or 25MS right beside NTT which actually brings you to Kowloon Tong station.


For those whose concern is always food, like me, well, there are two canteens in the HKBU campus near NTT, but don’t expect too much on the food okay? One is the on the 5th floor of the AAB Building (photo posted earlier) where you get most of the good stuff, at least relatively, but at NO DISCOUNT and closes earlier than the undergraduate canteen which closes at 11:00 in the evening (although there’s no more choice of food except the famous signature dish) but you get a discount, by showing your student ID card. Yay!

P.S. There’s also a Starbucks inside the campus, which you’ll surely visit at least 4 times in your HKBU life (or at least in our case) and Bistro Bon at the ground floor of NTT, you’ll surely eat here at least once to get Wi-fi and food on the first day cause you’re still too lost to find the other canteens. Haha!

 

The undergraduate canteen and counter which you’ll develop a “love-hate” relationship over time. Just a tip, NEVER order spaghetti here, hahaha (Hi, Putro!) The BBQ meals are safe, and their curry meals are the best by far.

 

Opening a bank account could be one of the most time-consuming thing to do as you start your life in HKBU. We opened ours at BEA or Bank of East Asia (because of the proximity to NTT), and they require many documents (student ID, admission offer, proof of residence in Hong Kong and in your home country, and tax number, also from your home country, if I remember it correctly), but it’s also rewarding, literally, cause they give out Starbucks coupon, yes, four coupons!!! This is why I said you’ll visit this place at least four times or if you’re that friendly, you might get to visit more than that. Hahaha!

 

This is the BEA branch inside HKBU. See that “random stranger” showing us how to withdraw in style Hahaha!

There are three “walkable” shops nearby: the small cooperative store at the 3rd floor of AAB building which I don’t really visit; Lok Fu which you access by passing through the library and straight, straight, straight ahead the first turn you see; and Festival Walk, which is near Kowloon Tong station. You’ll love UNY which has a $12 shop for everything school and home supply related (even purple slippers, hahaha Yen!) and the Lok Fu supermarket where you can get fresh fruits and a shop which sells Filipino, Thai, Indonesian, Indian, and Vietnamese goods! It’s an amazingggg store!

To end this long, boring blog, let me tell you that part of the reason why studying in Hong Kong has been fun so far, are my fellow scholars, people I’ve come to call family here. It’s a pleasure annoying you every day and making you laugh even if it’s not funny. Cheers to many more shared moments of “happy and sad” together! Posting their photos and moniker cause I’ll always remember them as that. All photos were taken by me. I also didn’t ask if I can post it, I know they won’t mind cause we’re friends like that. Haha! 

 

L-R First selfie attempts of Putro and Rahoof

We celebrated Pheana’s birthday in NTT like a pro!!! We had our own version of spaghetti, roasted chicken, and cake (cropped on purpose). Haha!

(Huang) Ding-ding ride with Putro and Pheana. RIP glasses!

First time to use the library conference room selfie. Wohooooo!

I forgot where we took this photo but I remember we ate at Jollibee (before or after) Haha!

I’m pretty sure we asked a Korean guy to take this photo


Putro “The Kawaii” - Pheana “The Bestfriend” -  Rahoof  “The Brilliant”  -  Yen “The Cap”                   

 

P.S. Charlee is “The Wallflower”. Putro and Rahoof are getting better at taking selfies; Pheana is loving our outdoor wanderings and; Yen is still the first person at the lobby before class. We are all good, deadlines are coming, but we will not falter! XOXO.

                                                             


Tags:  hong kong  life  student 

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